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So many children participate in recreational fall and spring soccer teams.  It’s a fun intro to the game and usually results in the little kids running in large groups up and down the field!  

Soccer can be a fun experience for many children, but it can be frustrating for others.  When children struggle with running as fast as their peers or following the rules of the game, the fun can be lost. This leaves parents wondering whether they should even have signed up their child at all.

Why do some children struggle with soccer?  We can look at several different possible reasons to try to understand.

Can the child run fast enough?  If the child can’t keep up their teammates, soccer can be an exercise in frustration.  Why bother trying when you’re not having success!

Can the child stand on one leg for longer enough to kick the ball?  If the child feels like they’re going to fall over, kicking is no fun anymore!

Can the child listen, look, and move at the same time?  For some children, using more than one sense and moving at the same time is just too much!  (Think rubbing your belly and tapping your head at the same time.)

The younger we can help children find success in a movement activity the better.  Soccer may not be the best fit for your child, but they also may need some extra help to get their bodies ready to successfully participate in soccer or other recreational activities.  

Free stock photo of sky, person, sunglasses, clouds

The goal of any extra help is to get the child out participating with friends and family to do the things they love!  It is also so helpful to do so at a young age, before a child’s confidence is impacted.

Many parents will seek out extra support when their children are around 5 years old, which is perfect.  The same movement skills that need to be developed for soccer and other recreational activities are the ones that will support the child in the classroom too!  So its success all around!

 

 

 

Have you heard the term “crossing midline”?  It is one of those phrases thrown around a lot from pediatric physical and occupational therapists.  We will often tell parents that their child needs to practice crossing the midline.

So what is it???

The midline is the center of your body. In this instance, we’re talking about splitting the left and right sides of the body.

When one arm crosses over to the other side, whether to write a sentence or reach for a toy, this is called “crossing the midline.”

When children have difficulty crossing midline, they might pass a pencil between hands instead of writing a full line with one hand.  

The child may have difficulty putting their socks and shoes on.

 

Another child might often sit in a W- position because it takes crossing midline to get in and out of other positions.

If your child has difficulty crossing midline, it is often recommended to practice this skill.  Before you do, check out the video below to learn the #1 Secret to Crossing the Midline!  

If your child does need more practice, there are many fantastic activities, dances and games you can try!

Here are a few awesome resources to check out:

  1. Here’s a fun collection of great videos that promote crossing the midline! 
  2. A nice list of activities that will be easy for a parent to try at home.
  3. Here’s the dance that was the bane of every teacher this past school year (but great for crossing the midine!)- The Floss!

Last, but not least, check out…

The #1 Secret to Crossing the Midline!

 

 

 

A new interactive tv show on Sprout called Tree Fu Tom has made its way over the pond from the UK. It is aimed at children ages 3-7 and my 4 year old has been asking to watch it again and again.

The show is about a boy named Tom who shrinks and turns into a cartoon to enter the world of his garden. Tom and his friends encounter challenges and have to problem solve solutions. This is where the magic comes in. Read more

As a mom of two girls and a PT for kids I often get asked about milestones and whether a parent should be concerned. There are many clues to whether a parent should be concerned that go beyond looking at a chart that tells you when a child typically will develop a skill. Read more

What does torticollis look like? A child will tilt their ear towards the shoulder and will turn to the opposite direction. A child with left torticollis will tilt their head to the left and prefer to look to the right. A child with right torticollis will tilt their head to the right and prefer to […]