What to do When Your Child Can’t Keep Up At Soccer

So many children participate in recreational fall and spring soccer teams.  It’s a fun intro to the game and usually results in the little kids running in large groups up and down the field!  

Soccer can be a fun experience for many children, but it can be frustrating for others.  When children struggle with running as fast as their peers or following the rules of the game, the fun can be lost. This leaves parents wondering whether they should even have signed up their child at all.

Why do some children struggle with soccer?  We can look at several different possible reasons to try to understand.

Can the child run fast enough?  If the child can’t keep up their teammates, soccer can be an exercise in frustration.  Why bother trying when you’re not having success!

Can the child stand on one leg for longer enough to kick the ball?  If the child feels like they’re going to fall over, kicking is no fun anymore!

Can the child listen, look, and move at the same time?  For some children, using more than one sense and moving at the same time is just too much!  (Think rubbing your belly and tapping your head at the same time.)

The younger we can help children find success in a movement activity the better.  Soccer may not be the best fit for your child, but they also may need some extra help to get their bodies ready to successfully participate in soccer or other recreational activities.  

Free stock photo of sky, person, sunglasses, clouds

The goal of any extra help is to get the child out participating with friends and family to do the things they love!  It is also so helpful to do so at a young age, before a child’s confidence is impacted.

Many parents will seek out extra support when their children are around 5 years old, which is perfect.  The same movement skills that need to be developed for soccer and other recreational activities are the ones that will support the child in the classroom too!  So its success all around!

 

 

 

The #1 Secret to Crossing the Midline

Have you heard the term “crossing midline”?  It is one of those phrases thrown around a lot from pediatric physical and occupational therapists.  We will often tell parents that their child needs to practice crossing the midline.

So what is it???

The midline is the center of your body. In this instance, we’re talking about splitting the left and right sides of the body.

When one arm crosses over to the other side, whether to write a sentence or reach for a toy, this is called “crossing the midline.”

When children have difficulty crossing midline, they might pass a pencil between hands instead of writing a full line with one hand.  

The child may have difficulty putting their socks and shoes on.

 

Another child might often sit in a W- position because it takes crossing midline to get in and out of other positions.

If your child has difficulty crossing midline, it is often recommended to practice this skill.  Before you do, check out the video below to learn the #1 Secret to Crossing the Midline!  

If your child does need more practice, there are many fantastic activities, dances and games you can try!

Here are a few awesome resources to check out:

  1. Here’s a fun collection of great videos that promote crossing the midline! 
  2. A nice list of activities that will be easy for a parent to try at home.
  3. Here’s the dance that was the bane of every teacher this past school year (but great for crossing the midine!)- The Floss!

Last, but not least, check out…

The #1 Secret to Crossing the Midline!

 

 

 

Embracing Summertime Fun: Tips For Keeping Kids Safe In The Sun And The Water

Our guest blogger, Amanda Henderson, is back with some fantastic tips about my favorite thing to do with kids in the summer- SWIM!

Children, Water Mirror, Nice, Sides Of Blue

 

Summertime is the prime time for kids to embrace the outdoors with trips to the park, the pool, and other outdoor venues. While this is a time for fun, it is important that parents consider the safety issues related to summer events, especially when it comes to the water. What are some of the best strategies available for keeping your children safe while they embrace the summer season?

Keep close to kids in the water and keep them protected

When it comes to the water, it is critically important that adults never leave young children alone. The Healthy Children site recommends that children under the age of five always be within an arm’s length of an adult, and they suggest that adults learn how to perform CPR. Pools at home should be completely fenced in, with a gate that kids cannot open themselves, and adults may want to consider getting an alarm for the gate as well. Also, explain and enforce pool safety rules and encourage children to discuss them with you so you know they understand.

Another water-related safety tip notes that adults should ensure that kids are wearing properly-fitting life jackets whenever they are on boats. In addition, parents and guardians should be aware of avoiding shallow water for diving, fast moving water, canals, and spots that have the potential for rip currents. Parents often rely on “floaties” or other inflatable devices to help their children in the water, but these should never be used as a substitute for supervision and all too often they provide a false sense of security.

Swim lessons can be a great way to help a child develop confidence in the water and in many communities, swim lessons are available from organizations such as the YMCA or local fitness clubs. In addition, oftentimes there are local swim clubs that can provide lessons to kids as well. Parents often can choose from group lessons at a local pool, semi-private lessons in small groups, or private lessons where the child works one-on-one with an instructor.

Simple steps can keep children safe from chemicals and exposure while outside or at the pool

Parents may not give a second thought to the chemicals used in pools, but as Fox News details, these pool chemicals cause a significant number of injuries every year. Many of these injuries happen at home pools, particularly when opening containers of chemicals or from entering the water too soon after chemicals been added to the water. Chemical containers should be kept away from children and adults handling them should ensure that they are following product directions and using appropriate safety gear.

Embracing the fun of summer also means sun and heat exposure, and adults have to take care to ensure that their children are protected properly during the sunny days. Sun exposure during one’s childhood can have a significant impact on developing melanoma later in life, and it is important that parents takes steps to protect their kids from sun damage.

Sunscreen and protective clothing are essential for outdoor safety

Tips for sun safety include making sure that children six months and under are kept out of direct sunlight and are dressed protectively to ensure that they are lightly covered up and comfortable. Kids of all ages should be dressed in lightweight protective clothing and hats are a great tool for added shelter from the sun.

Once children are more than six months old, sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of at least a rating of 15 is critical to use. Sunscreen should be applied ahead of heading into the sun and reapplied every couple of hours or after being in the water. Experts also recommend avoiding the middle hours of the day when the sun’s ultraviolet rays are the strongest and most harmful.

Playing at the park or heading to the pool can be great fun, but it’s important that steps are taken to ensure that kids remain safe. Adults need to protect children from the sun and stay close by their sides in the water. In addition, swim lessons are typically available in every community and they can be a great way to get kids comfortable in the water. Taking just a few simple steps before heading outdoors can go a long way toward keeping kids safe as they embrace the fun of summertime.

[Image by lecreusois/Pixabay]

Amanda Henderson is a mom to two wonderful, active boys and a preschool teacher. She enjoys writing in her free time, and recently decided to create Safechildren so that she would have a place to share her thoughts and favorite resources on parenting and child safety.