A Gaggle of Giggles Get No to Go

Today was a great reminder as to how far a little laughter can take you when working with a child to overcome a challenge. I was at the park with a little girl I treat in the early intervention program. She is almost 2 and had never been on a playground swing. She has unique medical needs that have limited her exposure to a lot of things outside her home, but today we were at the park and ready to give the swing a shot. She didn’t complain at all getting in. She has seen her older brother and sister on swings, so she definitely had the message that this was going to be FUN. Her mom put her in and started pushing her. At first she seemed ok, but then she got a little nervous. Mom says to me that she thinks she’s s-c-a-r-e-d (gotta love it when the kids don’t know how to spell yet!). I agree. I see things teetering. It could go either way. I step in and start playing the “got your toes” game and the giggles begin. We all breathe a sigh of relief. Our session was over after 5 minutes or so of swinging and I had to go. I left mom still pushing her in the swing (YAY!).

Laughter is often my first strategy when I child is scared when trying something new. Sometimes a few giggles are all it takes to get them over the hump. The energy changes, the child becomes engaged, and obstacles can be conquered. Coming soon, my list of back up strategies when the laughter tactic fails.

4 replies
  1. Barbara
    Barbara says:

    Looking forward to that list of back-up strategies! Would you be willing to include a quick list of giggle-inducing strategies? I won’t even suggest a research project to determine whether giggles are effective in therapy. *wink*

    Reply
  2. Barbara
    Barbara says:

    Looking forward to that list of back-up strategies! Would you be willing to include a quick list of giggle-inducing strategies? I won’t even suggest a research project to determine whether giggles are effective in therapy. *wink*

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] to be silly.  Sing songs, put funny hats on your head and be willing to do anything for a laugh (see giggle post).  Be creative, introduce new toys/activities/experiences, and get in touch with your childlike […]

  2. […] to be silly.  Sing songs, put funny hats on your head and be willing to do anything for a laugh (see giggle post).  Be creative, introduce new toys/activities/experiences, and get in touch with your childlike […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *